#WRITEPHOTO – STAMPS by trentsworld

An emotive, secretive story by trentsworld

Thank you so much for taking part in the #Writephoto – STAMPS prompt.

For visually challenged writersthe image shows a colourful collection of used stamps from various envelopes and postages.

A colourful collection of used stamps from various envelopes and postages.
Stamps – Image by KL Caley

Although I guess I had always known, it was really at her funeral that I realized how different Mom was from her younger siblings.  Looking down the row of mourners, I thought she might have been even more different from hers than I was from my own younger siblings.

It was brought home even more when I overheard Uncle Pat talking to Aunt Ann at the wake.  I don’t remember everything, but the way Ann said, “She was so much like our mother in oh so many ways,” that struck me.  Pat nudged her after that statement and tilted his head towards me. 

They changed the subject.

Why? What was it about her?

Mom was a War baby.  Grandma and Grandpa were married just after he was drafted in early ’42.  They wanted to be sure it happened just in case he never returned.

See more at:

Much Love
KL 

#WRITEPHOTO – STAMPS by masonsmenagerie

An exciting adventure by masonsmenagerie. When Phil’s love letter and calls go unanswered, he goes to find Jessica and finds a whole heap of trouble.

Thank you so much for taking part in the #Writephoto – STAMPS prompt.

For visually challenged writersthe image shows a colourful collection of used stamps from various envelopes and postages.

A colourful collection of used stamps from various envelopes and postages.
Stamps – Image by KL Caley

Glancing from the rain-spattered window to his phone on the desk, Phil groaned. He hated the modern technology culture despite being a website analyst. He detested how it reprogrammes the mind into having to check for new notifications a gazillion times a day. It ruins sleep patterns and destroys the ability to focus. Worse he realised it was so damned impersonal. You never really know who you’re talking to or if they’re genuinely alright when veiled behind a screen do you?

Just now, he was hoping for a text from his girlfriend Jessica. It had been more than a day since they’d traded loving messages, which was unusual for them.

Taking out a sheet of paper, Phil began writing a love letter. His fingers complained through the abnormal task but he smiled when he was done. Finding an envelope he sealed the letter inside, addressed it to Jessica and left to post it.

See more at:

Much Love
KL 

#WRITEPHOTO – STAMPS

Afternoon Everyone,

Welcome to the weekly #writephoto prompt!

Consider the postage stamp: its usefulness consists in the ability to stick to one thing till it gets there.

― Josh Billings

It’s that time of year when people reach out to loved ones. Do you (or a character) still write and send traditional cards? Do you still get a thrill when you see something with a proper stamp on it coming through your letterbox (I know I do)? Time to get writing.

A colourful collection of used stamps from various envelopes and postages.
Stamps – Image by KL Caley

For visually challenged writers, the image shows a colourful collection of used stamps from various envelopes and postages.

The regulars already know this bit, but for those that don’t:

  • Each Thursday at Noon GMT I will post the #writephoto prompt
  • Use the image and prompt as inspiration to create a post on your own blog… poetry, prose, humour… light or dark, whatever you choose, as long as it is fairly family-friendly.
  • Please have your entries linked back to the original prompt post by the following Tuesday at Noon GMT.
  • Link back to this post with a pingback (Hugh has an excellent tutorial here)  and/or leave a link in the comments below, to be included in the round-up.
  • Please click their links to visit the blogs of other contributors and take time to read and comment on their work.
  • Use the #writephoto hashtag in your title so your posts can be found.
  • There is no word limit and no style requirements, except that your post must take inspiration from the image and/or the prompt word given in the title of this post.
  • Feel free to use #writephoto logo or include the prompt photo in your post if you wish, or you may replace it with one of your own to illustrate your work.
  • By participating in the #writephoto challenge, please be aware that your post may be featured as a reblog on this blog and I will link to your post for the round-up each week.

If you need some more inspiration or fancy a bit of light reading, check out last weeks round-up.

I can’t wait to read your creations.

Take Care.

KL ❤

#Writephoto Round-Up – SHOPPING

Trolley’s dash left and right

It’s the last Christmas shopping night

Prices have gone bargain low

At least that’s what the shopper’s told

Can you get that last-minute gift?

Before there is a family rift!

Have you remembered the brussels sprouts?

Oh no! They have all sold out.

Extra blankets for the chair

Auntie will fall asleep in there

And hot chocolate for the kids

What a magic time of year it is!

Shopping Trolley in an empty supermarket
Shopping – Image by KL Caley

As a few of you have probably guessed this photo was taken during lockdown, this was a photo taken on an afternoon in a supermarket when the shop was scarily empty for the daytime with only the odd worker and customer to be seen.

In James Herbert’s book Dark Places (highly recommended), he discusses how something more ordinary can often be far creepier than going for the obvious cemetery at night scenario’s. Somehow, this makes me feel like this. A bright supermarket during the day being so oddly quiet with the odd trolley here and there. You know it should be bustling with people but it isn’t. Why? Well in this scenario we know why but I wanted to capture this moment as I think it could prove useful for revoking that feeling for some future writing.


What a bumper crop this week! It always amazes me how one little photo can bring so much creativity in so many different ways.

Here is the list below (if I have missed anyone, please let me know).

Entries:


I hope you’ll join me for another #writephoto challenge published today at 12 o’clock GMT.

Thank you all again for taking part in #writephoto – Shopping

With special thanks to Sue who originally made the #writephoto challenge so meaningful for all of us and gave me her blessing to continue it.

Take Care
KL ❤

Meet the Author – Geoff Le Pard

I can honestly say I was very excited to write this post. This is my first official participation in an author interview and wow – have I started on a good one. So without much further ado meeeeeettt (in my head at this point I am hearing a drumroll)….. Geoff Le Pard.

MEET THE AUTHOR - GEOFF LE PARD
MEET THE AUTHOR – GEOFF LE PARD

Many of you already know Geoff from his blog geofflepard.com, he’s also a regular contributor to the weekly #writephoto challenge and produces some phenomenal stories. He’s recently published a new book titled “The Art of Spirit Capture” (which can be found at the following links: Amazon.co.uk, Amazon.com ), so I sent Geoff a few questions to find out about the book, an insight into his writing process and to find out his favourite page-turners. His responses are (as you would expect from Geoff,) honest, brilliant and in places hilarious. I certainly had a huge smile, I hope you enjoy it too.

  • Tell us a bit about your book?

            It’s a mix of mystery, a bit of magic maybe, a Christmassy setting and possibly some romance. It follows Jason who we meet at the start when he’s been made redundant and is having to meet his ex to divi up their things. His brother is in a coma after a bike accident and very soon Jason’s going to be homeless. While this is happening he hears from a firm of lawyers that he and his brother have inherited his great aunt’s estate. When he goes to see the lawyer he finds out he’s going to be represented by Lotte who he knew as children and of whom he has less than favourable memories. The story centres on a Sussex town of Mendlesham, and its cast of characters who want to know Jason’s plans for his uncle’s captures. What are captures and why are they going to cause Jason so much grief and joy? You’ll have to read to find out.

  • Where do your ideas come from?

            Ah that old tricky one! This idea, you’ll be pleased to know came from a Writephoto prompt but they can come from anywhere. It might be a phrase (my first novel was based on the legal expression The Right to Roam, my first published novel on an incident in a hotel I worked in in 1976, Dead Flies and Sherry Trifle). I’ve got ideas from: meeting a woman raising money for a soup kitchen in Union Sq, San Francisco; the first time I let our rescue dog off the lead; peering through a hoarding round a building site on my way home from work one evening. As you know, with a lot of short fiction, I am stimulated by prompts.

  • Do you start with a character or a plot?

            I’d say mostly plot, but the story only has legs if I can find two or more characters who I want to write about. Character is essential if the book is to be readable and coherent.

  • Do you do a lot of research, if so, what is your ratio of research-to-writing?

            I’m useless at research. My Harry Spittle Series are essentially historic in that they are set, variously, in 1976, 1981, 1987 and the one I’m in the middle of right now, 1997. That means a fair bit of research but mostly to check my memory or find something that happened at the relevant time to build in some credibility. Walking into Trouble is set mostly on the Cotswolds Way, a 110 mile long distance footpath so I needed to make sure I knew the settings (I have walked it but a while back so some things had to be checked). Otherwise I try to avoid it. Apart from forming Dire Straits two years early (I’ve apologised to Mark Knopfler) in my first book, I think I’ve gotten away with it mostly. I take my lead from Graham Swift who said he never did research when asked why he ended his Booker Prize winning novel Last Orders in Margate. Admitting he’d never been there, he said it just seemed right for his characters but he didn’t feel the need to join them.

  • Does sitting down to write a novel get easier now that you are on book no (12?)?

            Both, I suppose. I’m not intimidated by starting, by the amount of time I know it will take, the fact that writing the first draft is probably the easy bit and finishing that is merely opening Pandora’s box to months, maybe years of editing. But I remain terrified I will not be able to make it work, that the ending will elude me, that the characters will take me so far away from where I was aiming that I have a totally different novel. When I started Walking Into Trouble (under a very different title), it was to be a light comedic tale. In the end it became dark, difficult, exploring fractured relationships and the damage that affairs can cause. There’s little humour. I wasn’t sure I wanted that and as a result two characters were written too flat with no nuance. Once I accepted what it had become, I concentrated on them and it lifted off the page.

  • Who do you enjoy reading?

            Gosh. In terms of the genres I enjoy: humorous/fantasy has me reaching for Terry Pratchett, Douglas Adams, Ben Aaronovitch, Marina Lewycka, Helen Fielding, Sue Townsend, Neil Gaiman, Fredrik Backman, PG Woodhouse, Graeme Simsion, Grant Naylor; Kim Harrison. Thriller/crime: Ian Rankin, Ann Cleeves, Chris Brookmyre, Stuart MacBride, Tess Gerritsen, Sue Grafton, Sara Paretsky. Jolly good literary fiction: Iain Banks, Lionel Shriver, Graham Swift, Eimear McBride, Rachel Joyce, Emma Healey. Classics: Dickens, Trollope, Wilkie Collins, Patrick Harrison, HG Wells, Harper Lee, Dorothy L Sayers. Non fiction: Bill Bryson, Adam Kaye, Tim Spector. Indie: Anne Goodwin, Phil Taylor, Ali Potts, Ruth Sutton, Don Massenzio. Whew…

  • What is in your to-read pile?

            Matilda Windsor is Coming Home by Anne Goodwin, The Authority Gap by Mary-Ann Sieghart, The Tao of Pooh by Benjamin Hoff


Big, Big thank you to Geoff for agreeing to be featured and taking the time to answer all my questions. Also, a big thank you for your continued support with the #writephoto prompt. I’ve downloaded The Art of Spirit Capture and can’t wait to read it (especially in the approaching festive season, it just seems so fitting).


Check out Geoff Le Pard’s Amazon Author Page for more info and see his wonderful collection of publications.

Here are a few intro’s to get you started:

My Father and Other Liars is a thriller set in the near future and takes its heroes, Maurice and Lori-Ann on a helter-skelter chase across continents.

Smashwords

Amazon.co.uk

Amazon.com

Dead Flies and Sherry Trifle is a coming of age story. Set in 1976 the hero Harry Spittle is home from university for the holidays. He has three goals: to keep away from his family, earn money and hopefully have sex. Inevitably his summer turns out to be very different to that anticipated.

Smashwords

Amazon.co.uk

Amazon.com

In this, the second book in the Harry Spittle Sagas, it’s 1981 and Harry is training to be a solicitor. His private life is a bit of a mess and he’s far from convinced the law is for him. Then an old acquaintance from his hotel days appears demanding Harry write his will. When he dies somewhat mysteriously a few days later and leaves Harry in charge of sorting out his affairs, Harry soon realises this will be no ordinary piece of work. After all, his now deceased client inherited a criminal empire and several people are very interested in what is to become of it.

Amazon.co.uk

Amazon.com

Would you like to be featured?

If any New2writing followers have an upcoming book and would like to be featured, please drop me an email at kl.caley@yahoo.co.uk.

I hope you enjoy reading this as much as I enjoyed writing it.

Take Care.

KL ❤

#Writephoto Round-Up – Stones

I loved this photo (and this view). There are a lot of places where people feel the veil between worlds is thin and whilst I am not sure what I believe in that regard, I imagine this could easily be one of those places. I definitely felt at peace here.

I very much imagine Sue (Vincent), the originator of the #writephoto prompt, would have loved it here and been able to shed more light on that feeling, these lands and the history. Indeed, she probably walked this path a time or two. This image was taken on the edge of North York Moors National Park.

I wonder if there is anywhere local to yourselves that gives that sensation of inner peace. If so, I’d love to hear about it.

Some stones are located in the grassland which is surrounded by hills.
Stones – Image by KL Caley

Well, the computer gremlins have been at work again this week. What is it they say, more hurry less speed?! Definitely applies to me. Whilst I was feeling smug and confident about a fantastic new author post and book launch post I’d written for Sunday. Apparently, those little devils forgot to remind me to set this post to publish….grrrr.

In amongst emergency covid tests and calls to the doctors (for darling my LB this time not me). I hadn’t noticed until today, apologies. However please do take time to read through them if you get a chance. We even have a couple of new entrants. Welcome to the challenge 🙂


Entries:


I hope you’ll join me for another #writephoto challenge published today yesterday at 12 o’clock GMT.

Thank you all again for taking part in #writephoto.

With special thanks to Sue who has been in my thoughts this week . She made the #writephoto challenge so meaningful for all of us and gave me her blessing to continue it.

Take Care
KL ❤

#WRITEPHOTO – SHOPPING

Afternoon Everyone,

Welcome to the weekly #writephoto prompt!

Is it too early to talk about this? Maybe… but as someone who likes to budget and plan I have already begun shopping for the big C day.

Is shopping to be loved or loathed? I can’t wait to see your responses.

Shopping Trolley in an empty supermarket
Shopping – Image by KL Caley

For visually challenged writers, the image does not show a red metal dinosaur in amongst the trees. It in fact shows a shopping trolley in a supermarket toiletry aisle.

The regulars already know this bit, but for those that don’t:

  • Each Thursday at Noon GMT I will post the #writephoto prompt
  • Use the image and prompt as inspiration to create a post on your own blog… poetry, prose, humour… light or dark, whatever you choose, as long as it is fairly family-friendly.
  • Please have your entries linked back to the original prompt post by the following Tuesday at Noon GMT.
  • Link back to this post with a pingback (Hugh has an excellent tutorial here)  and/or leave a link in the comments below, to be included in the round-up.
  • Please click their links to visit the blogs of other contributors and take time to read and comment on their work.
  • Use the #writephoto hashtag in your title so your posts can be found.
  • There is no word limit and no style requirements, except that your post must take inspiration from the image and/or the prompt word given in the title of this post.
  • Feel free to use #writephoto logo or include the prompt photo in your post if you wish, or you may replace it with one of your own to illustrate your work.
  • By participating in the #writephoto challenge, please be aware that your post may be featured as a reblog on this blog and I will link to your post for the round-up each week.

If you need some more inspiration or fancy a bit of light reading, check out last weeks round-up.

I can’t wait to read your creations.

Take Care.

KL ❤

#WRITEPHOTO – STONES by Jemima Pett

An intriguing entry by Jemima Pett

Thank you so much for taking part in the #Writephoto – STONES prompt.

For visually challenged writerssome stones are located in the grassland which is surrounded by hills.

Some stones are located in the grassland which is surrounded by hills.
Stones – Image by KL Caley

Serena Patricia Carruthers stood on the flat stone, surrounded by acres of rough moorland that gave way to heather and gorse up the hill.

“They seem to be in groups of four, or multiples. Almost like someone set them out as corners of a croft. Can you hear me? Caroline? Answer, please!” Serena checked the signal bars. Darn. That’s what you get in these remote parts of England. Remote parts of Africa would be as clear as a bell.

“Sorry, Serena, you broke up a little. Like someone what?”

Serena repeated her observation. “Can you track me at each one and we’ll map them out?”

“Okay. So, group A, starting with your present location, yes?”

“Yes. Mark 1.” Serena moved to the nearest stone. “Mark 2.”

See more at:

http://jemimapett.com/blog/2021/11/15/stones-of-wrath-writephoto-flash-fiction/

Much Love
KL 

#WRITEPHOTO – STONES by Lorraine’s frilly freudian slip

An intriguing and atmospheric entry by Lorraine’s frilly freudian slip

Thank you so much for taking part in the #Writephoto – STONES prompt.

For visually challenged writerssome stones are located in the grassland which is surrounded by hills.

Some stones are located in the grassland which is surrounded by hills.
Stones – Image by KL Caley

As I stood in the field, I felt Tamasin slip his hand into mine. “Hello, old love,” I whispered. His fingers squeezed tighter for an instant.

I let go and knelt down, “Our stones still lay as we left them.” I brushed a tear from my cheek, or was that Tamasin’s fingers?

“But then, you have been watching, have you not? 

See more at:

#writephoto stones – Lorraine’s frilly freudian slip

Much Love
KL 

#WRITEPHOTO – STONES by pensitivity101

Whilst I am used to reading pensitivity101‘s wonderful entries, this one caught the back of my throat and made me well up a little. Such a lovely tribute to the fallen.

Thank you so much for taking part in the #Writephoto – STONES prompt.

For visually challenged writerssome stones are located in the grassland which is surrounded by hills.

Some stones are located in the grassland which is surrounded by hills.
Stones – Image by KL Caley

Joe Baden was pleased with his purchase of the land he hoped to develop.
The field was overgrown but held great potential for his plans until its secrets were discovered.
When the first stone was unearthed, it was thought to be a single item, but as the grass was cut back, more were revealed and on closer inspection, each had an inscription.
Over two hundred stones were uncovered, some along the field perimeter and others within, but each was a tribute to one who died, their simplistic messages lovingly etched on the surface.

See more at:

Much Love
KL