Posted in Writing Extracts

The Writer’s Conflict – Clash of the Quotes

The inspiration just won’t come
Surely I’m not the only one
Let’s turn to the greats for advice
There I should find something nice

A classic quote from Mr Thoreau
An essayist, poet and philosopher too
A Harvard College education
Plus much more I haven’t mentioned

So what’s his advice for me to do
“Write while the heat is in you”
My heat has cooled down indeed
Perhaps a break is what I need

But wait, a new quote, from Stephen King
A writer indeed above all things
His books are a favourite, his advice is a must
He is certainly a voice I would trust

So what’s his advice for me to do
I guess it’s something I already knew
“Just get up and go to work”
Get on with it, I think with a smirk

Fingers to keyboard I begin to type
The classic or conventional which is right
This is my creation, I’ll let you judge
But it was the King that provided me that nudge.

Write while the heat is in you. The writer who postpones the recording of his thoughts uses an iron which has cooled to burn a hole with. Henry David Thoreau
Quote – Henry David Thoreau
Amateurs sit and wait for inspiration, the rest of us just get up and go to work. Stephen King
Quote – Stephen King

Originally written in response to Writer’s Quote Wednesday Writing Challenge (#WQWWC) now hosted by Marsha Ingrao at Always Right.

I often feel the devil and angel on my shoulders when it comes to writing. I have so many ideas but when I find decent time to write, they seem to escape me, I think that’s why I would lean towards Stephen King’s advice. Which quote do you feel more connected with?

KL

Posted in Know Your History

Know Your History – 16th June – Joyce Carol Oates born

know your history - writing

On this day… 16th June, 1937 – Joyce Carol Oates born

Joyce Carol Oates (born June 16, 1937) is an American author. Oates published her first book in 1963 and has since published over forty novels, as well as a number of plays and novellas, and many volumes of Joyce Carol Oatesshort stories, poetry, and nonfiction. She has won many awards for her writing, including the National Book Award, for her novel them (1969), two O. Henry Awards, and the National Humanities Medal. Her novels Black Water (1992), What I Lived For (1994), Blonde (2000), and short story collections The Wheel of Love and Other Stories (1970) and Lovely, Dark, Deep: Stories (2014) were each nominated for the Pulitzer Prize.

Oates has taught at Princeton University since 1978 and is currently the Roger S. Berlind ’52 Professor in the Humanities with the Program in Creative Writing.

On Writing

Joyce Carol Oates - Writing Advice