Happy St George’s Day

Happy St. George’s Day everyone! Are you doing anything to celebrate it?

I love a myth or legend. There is something in that ancient art of storytelling. It’s amazing that some of these stories have managed to pass down over the ages.


A bit about the legend of St. George:

St George is most widely known for slaying a dragon. According to legend, the only well in the town of Silene was guarded by a dragon. In order to get water, the inhabitants of the town had to offer a human sacrifice every day to the dragon. The person to be sacrificed was chosen by lots. On the day that St George was visiting, a princess had been selected to be sacrificed. However, inevitably he killed the dragon, saved the princess and gave the people of Silene access to water. In gratitude, they converted to Christianity.

It is thought that the dragon represents a certain type of pagan belief that included the sacrifice of human beings. Possibly Drivel but who can really tell.

My favourite version of St George’s Day:

In the book, Dracula by Bram Stoker, evil things are said to occur on St George’s Day, beginning at midnight. The date of St George’s Day presented in the book, 5 May (on the Western, Gregorian Calendar), is St George’s Day as observed by the Eastern Orthodox churches of that era.

(Excerpt from Dracula, 1897) “Do you know what day it is?” I answered that it was the fourth of May. She shook her head as she said again: “Oh, yes! I know that, I know that! but do you know what day it is?” On my saying that I did not understand, she went on: “It is the eve of St. George’s Day. Do you not know that tonight, when the clock strikes midnight, all the evil things in the world will have full sway?”


Whatever you chose to do, I hope you all have a great weekend.

Much Love,
KL ❤

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Happy St George’s Day

Happy St George’s Day WordPressers!

My Inspiration for today, St George and the stories surrounding him (everyone loves a good story), might even be inspired to do a few doodles or tales of my own later today, but for now…

The Myth:

The cultural image of Saint George slaying a dragon comes from Medieval legends of his past (initially invented by a French bishop), when tales of knights became a storytelling mainstay.

This better-known myth, The Golden Legend, involves Saint George coming across marshland in Libya, where a city was continually menaced by a dragon.

The townspeople fed the dragon sheep to keep it placated, and when that no longer worked, they started to elect human sacrifices.

For one of these sacrifices, the king’s daughter was selected, but Saint George arrived in the nick of time to intervene.

He faced down the dragon on horseback and managed to mortally wound the beast, but instead of landing the final blow, he decided to tame it, and delivered his prize back to the city.

Google Image - St George

The Facts:

He wasn’t English at all.

George, a Christian, is believed to have been born in Cappadocia, an area which is now in Turkey in the 3rd century AD.

He then went on to live in Palestine and became a soldier in the Roman army.

He later protested against Rome’s persecution of Christians and was imprisoned and tortured, but stayed true to his faith.

His life ended when he was beheaded at Lydda in Palestine.

 

My favourite version of St George’s Day:

In the book, Dracula by Bram Stoker, evil things are said to occur on St George’s Day, beginning at midnight. The date of St George’s Day presented in the book, 5 May (on the Western, Gregorian Calendar), is St George’s Day as observed by the Eastern Orthodox churches of that era.

(Excerpt from Dracula, 1897) “Do you know what day it is?” I answered that it was the fourth of May. She shook her head as she said again: “Oh, yes! I know that, I know that! but do you know what day it is?” On my saying that I did not understand, she went on: “It is the eve of St. George’s Day. Do you not know that tonight, when the clock strikes midnight, all the evil things in the world will have full sway?”