Review of The Sin Eater by Sarah Rayne – 5 stars

The Sin EaterThe Sin Eater by Sarah Rayne

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

This is the second of the Nell West series by Sarah Rayne (Property of a Lady being the first) and whilst they still have the historical fiction and modern day interlinked storylines that Rayne seems to do brilliantly, they aren’t quite as dark and unnerving as her standalone novels (such as House of the Lost). I did make the mistake of not reading the stories in the correct order and whilst this doesn’t detract too much from the story as it’s quite strong on its own, I do wish I had read them in the correct order as I think the character development of Nell and Michael is such a good minor storyline and would have been better to have read it in the correct order.

In the modern storyline we go with antiques dealer Nell to a Large London house. We meet troubled Benedict Doyle who has inherited the house from his great-grandfather. Benedict finds the house the house disturbing and soon finds himself having troubled dreams featuring the previous occupant, but the events he is dreaming about seem so real. When these dream events are revealed to Michael Flint (Oxford Don who featured in the first novel), his interest is piqued and he starts to research the historical facts behind Benedict’s dreams.

The second storyline for me, made this novel and is why I’ve given it five stars. The story follows Declan and Colm whom move from their Irish home to London city and get caught up in a situation and a world that they never expected to find themselves in.

Other reviewers have complained that Rayne’s writing style has changed with the Nell West series and whilst I agree she has reduced a lot of the darker elements of her writing, I think if anything she has increased the mystery elements of these novels. The storylines are very sharp, intricate and clever, this one surrounds a chess piece yet it is so well written you cannot help but get swept up in the storyline.

I also think Rayne’s characters are evolving, in this novel you really feel sorry for Benedict; his mental condition and how he is suffering as he tries to split what is real from what is imaginary. I actually finished this book a little while ago but the story and characters still feel very vivid and I think that is a sign of how well the story has been told.

For those that haven’t discovered the Nell West collection, I would suggest these novels are quite similarly written to Phil Rickman’s work; old story exposed, great characters and slightly eerie.

Please leave a like if you think my review/feedback of the item was helpful to you. Alternatively, please contact me if you want me to clarify something in my review.

View all my reviews

Advertisements

Review of Hiss & Hers by M.C. Beaton – 3 Stars

Hiss and Hers (Agatha Raisin, #23)Hiss and Hers by M.C. Beaton

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Agatha is a little too keen on gardener George (as are many of the woman in the village) but when his body is discovered in a compost heap with a bag over his head that has recently contained a poisonous snake, it is a little too late for the romance to kindle. Instead Agatha and her team through their efforts together to help track the killer.
I am always unsure whether to leave a neutral/negative review of a book or not. My reading interests are quite far and wide and often enjoyment of a book is down to personal taste but I thought I should leave this review for others as I feel as a fan of MC Beaton a little let down. I adore her Hamish series and although never quite as fond of the Agatha series they are normally still an enjoyable light read.

So…onto the negative(s)
The murderer was pretty obvious (to me) from the beginning and there was very little in the way of the usual plot twists and misdirects. It left me feeling a little flat instead of that usual intrigue to get to the end.
The actual writing/language within this book was often quite plain and boring, not as dynamic as it has been in the Hamish series or even earlier Agatha R books. I didn’t really feel as though I got swept up in the characters and their misdemeanours as I normally would.

However… there are still positives.
Some sections of the book are very humorous and very enjoyable.
The use of Agatha’s colleagues (Toni, Simon, Phil and Patrick) and their concern for her (and the trouble she gets herself into) is a lovely dynamic and it’s nice that these characters have featured a little bit more, especially the use of Toni’s sleuthing skills.

For those that haven’t read any MC Beaton, think a jollier version of Agatha Christie’s work. The Hamish series is far better, so I’d recommend you start there. But overall this book was enjoyable, just not as good as the others.

Please leave a like if you think my review/feedback of the item was helpful to you. Alternatively, please contact me if you want me to clarify something in my review.

View all my reviews

Review of Servants by Lucy Lethbridge

Servants: A Downstairs History of Britain from the Nineteenth-Century to Modern TimesServants: A Downstairs History of Britain from the Nineteenth-Century to Modern Times by Lucy Lethbridge

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

This book is made up from a wide range of sources showing the history of servants and those that have spent life in service. The book includes not only those in service and their memories but also their employers. The book also includes various size households showing a vast array of living throughout the classes and ages.
One of the things I liked most about this book was the author’s writing style, incredibly interesting, informative but not patronising. All the source data provided was very clear but did not read like a PhD textbook!
This thing about this book is, it is really thought-provoking. You start to think that these roles in so many cases are still taken for granted: – cooking, cleaning, childcare, gardening, caretaking, nursing etc. Yet they are so critical. Obviously, there are some things in place now to help these roles (couldn’t live without my Dyson!). The book also does give you an appreciation for society and how it has evolved in the past 100 years or so.
Overall this is a very insightful and informative book and I would recommend to anyone that has an interest in social classes, Victorian history or even just a big Downton Abbey fan .

View all my reviews

Review of Miss peregrines home for peculiar children by Ransom Riggs

Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children (Miss Peregrine’s Peculiar Children, #1)Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Miss peregrines home for peculiar children is based on a young boy called Jacob and the stories he was told by his grandfather. When his grandfather passes away in unusual circumstances Jacob begins to question the events his grandfather he was told about. When a psychologist suggests that Jacob goes to the remote Scottish Island that his grandfather based the stories on Jacob knows he has to go and find out the truth.
This book will really appeal to fans of Harry Potter and X-men stories. Something that is a little different but told from the viewpoint of someone that seems to be normal, finding out the truth about himself. Yet it is darker than either of those tales, almost in the genre of horror.
Ransom Riggs has quite a quirky writing style and I really enjoyed it. The use of the images throughout the book was so sinister and intriguing. It was a really refreshing approach to story-telling, which I really enjoyed.
Please leave a like/helpful vote if you think my review/feedback of the item was helpful to you. Alternatively, please contact me if you want me to clarify something in my review.

View all my reviews

Review of Malevolent by E.H. Reinhard – 4.5 Stars

Malevolent (Lieutenant Kane, #1)Malevolent by E.H. Reinhard

My rating: 4.5 of 5 stars

A woman arrives at an airport, the next time she is seen is when she is found dead in an alley in a dumpster wearing only green lingerie. Worse she has holes drilled into her head and a powerful drug in her system. Soon the press label the killer psycho surgeon and it’s easy to see why. Can Lieutenant Carl Kane and his partner hunt down this killer before more woman show up?

This book his pretty intense, certainly gory as other readers have pointed out in reviews, so if you’re a bit squeamish there will be a few chapters to skip over. I did get this book for free and although a fan of detective crime fiction was unsure what to expect from this new author in a field that is already pretty full with the likes of Mark Billingham, Ian Rankin, amongst countless others. That said I actually found myself really enjoying this book. It was very well written.
Not going to lie, the book is dark. That just makes you want the good guys to catch the bad guys, even more. Kane himself is quite likeable, with a good spark between him and his partner. Kane lives alone with his cat, he even finds time for a love interest.

The only real negative I would say is there are a few places that there is a lot of descriptions going on that’s purpose seems to be just to fill out the pages a little, especially in comparison to the mostly sharp action-filled pace of writing Reinhard seems to adopt for the majority of the book. Then again, this could be to give the book a bit of a relief from the fast pace.
All in all, a fabulous start to a great new series. Book works perfectly as a standalone novel but there is plenty of room for the character to grow and I expect this will be a long-running series. Not for the faint of heart, perfect for those that enjoy the grittier side of crime drama. Action heavy, fun, fast-paced novel.
Please leave a “like” if you think my review/feedback of the item was helpful to you. Alternatively, please contact me if you want me to clarify something in my review.

View all my reviews

Review of Rules for a Perfect Life by Niamh Greene – 3.5 Stars

Rules for a Perfect LifeRules for a Perfect Life by Niamh Greene

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

My review for this is really a 3.5 Stars.
Maggie has a taste for the nicer things in life, she has a nice man, a nice job and a love of nice handbags. On a whim, she decides nice isn’t good enough for her and ditches her fella. Soon after she finds herself out of a job due to the housing market crash and finds herself in need of a new home too. With few other options when her friend offers her the chance to move out to the country to house sit for her, Maggie accepts. She soon finds out country life is not all it’s cracked up to be!

Niamh Greene has a very easy to read writing style, and I would suggest Marion Keyes fans will adore her. My only concern is the story felt a little drawn out (however that may just be this novel or my own preference). The story followed the typical rom-com structure and I enjoyed it as an easy light-hearted read.

While Maggie as a character did get a fair few drama’s thrown at her to deal with, I actually found her character a little frustrating. She came across as a bit spoilt and selfish and it took me a while to get behind her and start willing her to get the guy (haha). Although some of her sarcasm was top notch. The guy, however, came across as lovely, single devoted father, hard-worker, and all-round family man. You really do want him to get his happily ever after.

The tale was very similar to those by Marion Keyes, I would say Greene is not quite as good as Sophie Kinsella or Helen Fielding but similar in a lot of ways.

A good, enjoyable holiday read, I would certainly read more from this author but I do think it could have been even better.

View all my reviews

Review of The Guardians by Andrew Pyper – 4 Stars

The GuardiansThe Guardians by Andrew Pyper

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Trevor, Randy and Carl return to the small town they grew up in for the funeral of their friend Ben. They are surprised to find that Ben had become a recluse after they left town and spent most of his time watching over “Thurman House”. The house brings back tortured memories for the boys and they find themselves struggling over whether to confront their past or not, but after another friend goes missing the past can no longer stay hidden.

The story is told from the viewpoint of Trevor and his Dictaphone diary entries with occasional flashbacks to the boys’ childhood. This captures the story really well and Andrew manages to weave a lot of subtler subplots into the story, which really kept the suspense on top form. Trevor is a very likeable character. His journey to discover whether the house is haunted or if it’s all just his imagination brings out the strengths and flaws in his personality, but underlying throughout the difficult situation is his brotherhood “in-it-together-no-matter-what-happens” attitude.

Other reviewers have suggested this is similar to Stephen Kings writing and while at some of the more suspense-driven parts I can see this, for me it wasn’t scary. It wasn’t really a horror, the plot certainly had darker elements but there was very little fear factor. However, I enjoyed the mystery of the novel, and the friendships and relationships throughout.

View all my reviews

I would have preferred this book to be a little scarier (to be put in the same category as a Stephen King/James Herbert style horror) but it was an enjoyable read and I will look out for more works by Andrew Pyper.