Know Your History – 14th November – P.J. O’Rourke born

know your history - writingOn this day… 14th November 1947 – P.J. O’Rourke born.

Patrick Jake “P. J.” O’Rourke (born November 14, 1947) is an American political satirist, journalist, writer, and author. O’Rourke is the H. L. Mencken Research Fellow at the Cato Institute and is a regular correspondent for The Atlantic Monthly, The American Spectator, and The Weekly Standard.

He is the author of 20 books, of which his latest, The Baby Boom: How It Got That Way (And It Wasn’t My Fault) (And I’ll Never Do It Again), was released January 2014. This was preceded on September 21, 2010, by Don’t Vote! – It Just Encourages the Bastards. In 1981, O’Rourke began publishing in magazines such as Playboy, Vanity Fair, Car and Driver, and Rolling Stone.

On Writing p.j.o-rourke

O’Rourke types his manuscripts on an IBM Selectric typewriter, though he denies that he is a Luddite, asserting that his short attention span would make focusing on writing on a computer difficult. In a January 2007 interview, O’Rourke gave an example of his view of computers and writing by referencing novelist Stephen King, whom he paraphrased – saying had he a computer, he could have written three times as much in his early days. To which O’Rourke remarked, “Does the world need three times as many Cujos? Three times as many Jane Austens, maybe.”

Did You Know?..

According to a 60 Minutes profile, O’Rourke is the most quoted living man in The Penguin Dictionary of Modern Humorous Quotations.

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